Start Dating sites for women in eastern europe

Dating sites for women in eastern europe

A swastika generally takes the form of a rotationally symmetrical arrangement (a wheel) with four equally spaced legs of identical length each bent at 90 degrees in a uniform direction to create a pattern akin to a four-armed spiral.

Carl Sagan in his book Comet (1985) reproduces Han period Chinese manuscript (the Book of Silk, 2nd century BC) that shows comet tail varieties: most are variations on simple comet tails, but the last shows the comet nucleus with four bent arms extending from it, recalling a swastika.

According to Reza Assasi, the swastika is a geometric pattern in the sky representing the north ecliptic pole centred to Zeta Draconis.

He argues that this primitive astrological symbol was later called the four-horse chariot of Mithra in ancient Iran and represented the centre of Ecliptic in the star map and also demonstrates that in Iranian mythology, the cosmos was believed to be pulled by four heavenly horses revolving around a fixed centre on clockwise direction possibly because of a geocentric understanding of an astronomical phenomenon called axial precession.

To Jews and the enemies of Nazi Germany, it became a symbol of antisemitism and terror. The earliest known textual use of the word swastika is in Panini's Ashtadhyayi, where it is used to explain one of the Sanskrit grammar rules, in the context of a type of identifying mark on cow's ear.

under the commonly used IAST transliteration system, but is pronounced closer to "swastika" when letters are used with their English values. Left: a left facing swastika, also called counterclockwise, appears in the Bon tradition; Right: a right facing swastika, typically called clockwise, appears commonly in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

Sagan suggests that in antiquity a comet could have approached so close to Earth that the jets of gas streaming from it, bent by the comet's rotation, became visible, leading to the adoption of the swastika as a symbol across the world.

Bob Kobres in his 1992 paper Comets and the Bronze Age Collapse contends that the swastika like comet on the Han Dynasty silk comet atlas was labeled a "long tailed pheasant star" (Di-Xing) because of its resemblance to a bird's foot or footprint, In Life's Other Secret (1999), Ian Stewart suggests the ubiquitous swastika pattern arises when parallel waves of neural activity sweep across the visual cortex during states of altered consciousness, producing a swirling swastika-like image, due to the way quadrants in the field of vision are mapped to opposite areas in the brain.

Investigators have also found seals with "mature and geometrically ordered" swatiskas which date from prior to the Indus Valley Civilization (3300–1300 BCE).